Apple Loops

The loop browser lets you quickly find loops to add to your projects.
You can find loops using keywords for instrument, musical genre, or mood.
You can also perform text searches, and refine your results in several ways.
The loop browser shows the tempo, key, and number of beats for each matching loop.
You can preview loops in the loop browser before you add them to a project, and add more loops to GarageBand by dragging them onto the loop browser.

The loop browser gives you two ways to find loops: Button view and Column view.

Button View:

In button view, the loop browser contains a set of keyword buttons.
Click a button to show matching loops in the results list.
Clicking multiple buttons narrows the results to those loops that match all of the selected keywords.

A – Keyword buttons: Click a keyword button to display matching loops in the results list. You can click multiple keyword buttons to narrow your results.

B – View buttons: Click one of the buttons to show column view, button view, or podcast sounds view.

C – Scale pop-up menu: Choose a scale type to see only loops using that musical scale.

D – Search field: Type text in the field to see loops with the text in their file name or path.

E – Preview volume slider: Drag the slider to adjust the volume of the loop being previewed.

F – Results list: Shows loops that match the selected keywords.
Also displays the tempo, key, and number of beats for each loop.

  • Click a loop in the results list to preview it.
  • Click the Favs checkbox for a loop to add it to your favorites.

G – Loop library pop-up menu: Choose the loops you want to show in the loop browser from the pop-up menu.

Column View and Podcast Sounds View:

In column view, the loop browser features columns for keyword type, categories, and keywords.
Click a keyword type to show categories for that type, click a category to show keywords, then click a keyword to show matching loops in the results list.
Clicking multiple keywords expands the results to those loops matching any of the selected keywords.
In podcast sounds view, the loop browser shows a different set of columns, featuring sound effects, jingles, and other loops suitable for podcasts.
You work with the columns in podcast sounds view the same way you do in columns view.

A – Keyword type column: Click a keyword type to show the categories for that keyword type in the middle column.

B – Category column: Click a category to show keywords for that category in the right column.

C – Keyword column: Click a keyword to show matching loops in the results list.
You can click multiple keywords to expand your results.

D – View buttons: Click one of the buttons to change the view between column, button, or podcast sounds view.

E – Scale pop-up menu: Choose a scale type to see only loops using that scale.

F – Search field: Type text in the field to see loops with the text in their file name or path.

G – Preview volume slider: Drag the slider to adjust the volume of the loop being previewed.

H – Results list: Shows the loops that match the selected keywords.
Also displays the tempo, key, and number of beats for each loop.

  • Click a loop in the results list to preview it.
  • Click the Favs checkbox for a loop to add it to your favorites.

Finding Loops With the Loop Browser:

GarageBand includes a loop browser that lets you find loops by musical instrument,
genre, or mood. You can also perform text searches, and refine your searches for loops
in several other ways. No matter how large your collection of loops becomes, you can
quickly find loops with the sound you want using the loop browser.

To show the loop browser:

  • Click the Loop Browser button (the button with the open eye).

The loop browser has three views: column view, button view, and podcast sounds view.
In button view, you click keyword buttons to show loops that match the keywords. In
column view and podcast sounds view, you choose from different keyword types,
categories, and keywords to show matching loops. You can select the loop browser
view you want using the view buttons in the lower-left corner of the loop browser.

To choose the type of view:

  • Click the button with columns to show column view, click the button with musical notes to show button view, or click the button with a bell to show podcast sounds view.

Finding Loops in Column View:

In column view, clicking a keyword type in the left column shows categories for that
keyword type in the middle column.
Clicking a category shows keywords for that category in the right column.
Clicking a keyword shows matching loops in the results list.
You can expand your results by clicking multiple keywords.

To find loops in column view:

1. Click the column button in the lower-left corner of the loop browser to switch to column view.
2. Click a keyword type in the left column.
3. Click a category in the middle column.
4. Click a keyword in the right column to show matching loops in the results list.
5. To refine your results, click multiple categories or keywords.

This expands the matching loops to include those that match any of the selected categories or keywords.

Now find some bass loops in column view by first selecting the By Instruments keyword type, then the Bass category, then the Grooving keyword.
When you find loops in either button view or column view, the total number of
matching loops is shown next to the search field at the bottom of the loop browser.

Finding Loops in Button View:

Button view features a grid of keyword buttons.
You click a button to see the loops matching the selected keyword in the results list to the right.
You can narrow your results by clicking multiple buttons.

To find loops in button view:

1. Click the button with musical notes in the lower-left corner of the loop browser to
switch to button view.
2. Click a keyword button to show matching loops in the results list.
The columns in the results list show the type of loop, name, tempo, key, and number of beats for each loop.
3. To refine your results, click multiple keyword buttons.
This narrows the matching loops to only those that match all of the selected keywords.
4. To end a search, either click the selected keyword again to deselect it, or click the Reset button to deselect all selected keywords.

When you click a keyword, incompatible keywords (those that share no loop with the
selected keyword) are dimmed.

Now find some drum loops in button view by clicking the Drums keyword button.
Scroll through the list to see all the matching loops. Notice that the number of
matching loops is shown next to the search field.

Finding Loops in Podcast Sounds View:

Podcast sounds view features a different set of columns letting you easily find and add
podcast sounds. You find loops in podcast sounds view in the same way as in column
view.

Previewing Loops in the Loop Browser:

When you find loops that fit the criteria you want, you can preview them in the loop
browser to hear which loop will sound best in your project. You can preview the loop
by itself (solo), or hear it playing together with the project.

To preview a loop:

  • Click the loop in the results list.
  • Click the loop again to stop previewing it.

Once you have added loops or recorded instruments in your project, you can preview a
loop together with the project by clicking the Play button before you click the loop.
When you preview a loop with a project, GarageBand matches the tempo and key of
the loop to the project’s tempo and key, and syncs the loop with the project so it starts
playing on the beat.

When you preview a loop, you can also control the volume of the loop using the
volume slider in the loop browser.

To adjust the volume of a loop being previewed:

  • Drag the volume slider in the loop browser left to lower the loop’s volume, or right to
  • raise the loop’s volume.

If you adjust the volume of a loop in the loop browser, then add the loop to your
project by dragging it to an empty part of the timeline, the volume of the track created
for the loop is set to the same volume.
Now try previewing the loops you found earlier, and see which ones you like.

Refining Your Searches:

There are several ways you can refine your searches in the loop browser.

You can:

  • Display only loops from a specific Jam Pack or folder
  • Display loops using a particular scale type
  • Display only loops in keys near the project’s key
  • Perform text searches

Displaying Loops From a Jam Pack or Folder:

If you have installed one or more of the GarageBand Jam Packs on your computer, your
loop library can contain many thousands of loops. To make searching for loops easier,
you can choose to display only loops from a specific Jam Pack, or only the loops
included with GarageBand. If you have created your own loops or added loops from
another source, you can also choose to display only those loops.


To display loops from a specific Jam Pack or folder:

  • Choose the Jam Pack or folder with the loops you want to see from the loop library pop-up menu, located to the right of the word “Loops” at the top of the loop browser.

Searching by Scale Type:

Most loops other than drum loops are recorded using a particular musical scale. In
most cases, when you arrange several loops so that they play together, you’ll want to
use loops with the same scale type. You can narrow the loops shown in the results list
to those using either the major or minor scale, those using neither scale, or those good
for both.


To display only loops with a particular scale type:

  • Choose the scale type from the Scale pop-up menu.

Drum loops don’t usually have a scale type, so try refining the bass loops you found
earlier to show only those using the major scale.

Limiting Searches to Nearby Keys:

Loops with melody and harmony instruments are recorded in a specific musical key.
When you add a loop to a project, GarageBand matches the loop’s key with the key of
the project. The closer the loop’s original key is to the key of the project, the more
natural the loop will sound when transposed to the project’s key. When a loop is
transposed by a large number of semitones, the result can sometimes sound unnatural
or distorted.

To display loops only in keys near the project’s key:

1. Choose GarageBand > Preferences, then click Loops.
2. In the Loops pane, click the “Filter for more relevant results” checkbox.

Note: The “Filter for more relevant results” checkbox is selected by default. To see loops
in keys farther away from the project’s key, deselect the checkbox.

Searching for Specific Text:

You can quickly find loops with specific text in their file name or path using the search
field. This makes it easy to find a loop by name, or to find all loops in a specific folder.

To perform text searches for loops:

  • Type the text you want to search for in the search field, then press Return.
  • Loops with the text in either their file name or path will be shown in the results list.
  • Try refining the drum loops you found earlier by typing “acoustic”, “club”, or “funk” in the search field.
  • You can try typing other words to see what results you get.

You can use several methods together to find specific loops. For instance, you can use
keywords with the Scale pop-up menu, or with the search field, to find only bass loops
using the major scale, or to find only percussion loops with “latin” in the file name.

Adding Loops to the Timeline:

When you find a loop you want to use in your project, you add the loop to the timeline.


To add a loop to the timeline:

Drag the loop from the loop browser to an empty part of the timeline where there is
no track. A new track of the appropriate type is created, and the loop is added to the
new track.

You can also create a new track, then drag a loop of the same type (Real or Software
Instrument) to the track. To learn about creating tracks, see Chapter 6 and Chapter 7.

There are two types of Apple Loops:

  1. Real Instrument loops
  2. Software Instrument loops.

In the loop browser, the loop’s icon shows which type each loop is. Real
Instrument loops can be dragged only to a Real Instrument track, and Software
Instrument loops can be dragged to either a Real or Software Instrument track. Either
type can be dragged to an empty part of the timeline to create a new track.

You can also convert a Software Instrument loop to a Real Instrument loop when you
drag it to the timeline. Real Instrument loops require less processing power for
playback, which can allow you to use more tracks and effects in your project, especially
for projects with many loops.

To convert a Software Instrument loop to a Real Instrument loop:

  • Option-drag the loop from the loop browser to the timeline.

By default, Option-dragging a Software Instrument loop converts it to a Real
Instrument loop. You can change the default so that dragging a Software Instrument
loop converts it to a Real Instrument loop, and Option-dragging does not convert it.

To change the default behavior for converting Software Instrument loops:

1. Choose GarageBand > Preferences, then click Loops.
2. Select the “Convert to Real Instrument” checkbox next to “Adding Loops to the
Timeline.”

When you add a loop to a project, a region is created from the loop in the timeline. The
edits you make to the region do not change the original loop, so you can always return
to the original sound of the loop or use it in another project.
Now try adding some of the drum and bass loops you found earlier to the timeline.

Creating Your Own Apple Loops:

You can save Real and Software Instrument regions you record as Apple Loops. When
you save a region as an Apple Loop, it is added to the loop library and appears in the
loop browser, so you can use it in other projects.

Apple Loops you create from recorded regions match the tempo and key of the
project, just like the Apple Loops included with GarageBand.

To save a region as an Apple Loop:

1. Select the region in the timeline.
2. Choose Edit > Add To Loop Library, or drag the region over the loop browser.
3. In the Add Loop dialog, do the following:

  • Type a name for the loop.
  • Choose the scale and genre from the pop-up menus.
  • Choose an instrument category and instrument name from the list.
  • Click the appropriate mood buttons for easy searching.

4. Click Create.

Adding Loops to the Loop Library:

When you install GarageBand, the loops included with the application are installed in
the Apple Loops library. When you add more loops to your collection, they are installed
in the loop library, and appear in the loop browser for you to use.

To add Apple Loops to your loop library:

  • Drag the loops, or the folder containing the loops, over the loop browser.

The loops are added to the Apple Loops library and are immediately available to use in your projects.

If you add loops located on a different hard disk or partition, a dialog appears asking
whether you want to copy them to the loop library, or index them in their current
location. If you add loops from the desktop, a dialog asks if you want to move them or
index them in their current location.

If you add loops located on a CD or DVD, GarageBand copies them to the loop library.

Working With Projects

Creating a Project:

You start working in GarageBand by creating a new project.

To create a new project:

1. Choose File > New.
2. In the New Project dialog, select the type of project you want to create.
3. In the dialog that appears, browse to the location where you want to store the project, then type a name for the project in the Name field.
4. Set the project’s tempo, key, and time signature as described in the following sections.
5. When you have finished making the project settings, click Create.

Setting the Tempo:

Each project has a speed, or tempo. The tempo defines the rate at which beats, the
basic rhythmic pulse, occur in the project. The tempo is measured in beats per minute,
or bpm. You can set the tempo to any speed between 60 and 240 bpm.
The default tempo is 120 bpm, which is a common tempo used in popular music.

To set the tempo:

In the New Project dialog, drag the Tempo slider left to slow down the tempo, or right
to speed up the tempo.

Note: You can change the tempo later in the time display, located below the timeline,
or in the Track Info pane for the master track.

Setting the Key:

Each project has a key, which defines the central note to which the other notes in the
music relate, and the scale used (either “major” or “minor”).

To set the key:

1. In the New Project dialog, choose a key from the Key pop-up menu.
2. Choose the scale from the Scale pop-up menu to the right of the Key pop-up menu.

Note: You can change the key later in the Track Info pane for the master track.
If you change the key of a project after recording instruments or adding loops, all
Software Instrument recordings and loops are transposed to the new key. Real
Instrument recordings are not transposed.

Setting the Time Signature:

Each project also has a time signature, which controls the relationship between beats
and measures. A project’s time signature consists of two numbers separated by a
forward slash, which look similar to a fraction. The number on the left controls the
number of beats in each measure, and the number on the right controls the beat value
(the length of the note that gets one beat).

You can use any of the following time signatures in a GarageBand project:

  • 2/2, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 5/4, 7/4, 6/8, 7/8, 9/8, or 12/8.

The default is 4/4, the most commonly used time signature.

To set the time signature:

In the New Project dialog, choose a time signature from the Time pop-up menu.

Note: You can change the time signature later in the Track Info pane for the
master track.


Opening an Existing Project:

You can open an existing project to continue working.

To open an existing project:

Choose File > Open, locate and select the project you want to open, then click OK.

You can also open a recently open project by choosing File > Open Recent and
choosing a project from the submenu.

If you close the currently open project, a dialog appears, asking if you want to create a
new project or open an existing project.


Saving a Project:

As you work, it’s important to save your project often so you don’t lose your changes.

To save a project:

Choose File > Save (or press Command-S).

When you save a project, by default GarageBand creates an iLife preview that is saved
with the project. An iLife preview lets you preview the project in the Media Browser
and in other iLife applications, but can increase the project’s file size. You can select
whether to create an iLife preview for projects in the General pane of GarageBand
Preferences.

You can also save a project as an archive. When you save a project as an archive, all the
audio files, loops, and other media the project uses are saved in the project file. This is
especially useful if you want to copy the project to another computer, or are
duplicating a project with your own Real Instrument recordings.

To save a project as an archive:

1. Choose File > Save as.
2. In the Save As dialog, select the Save As Archive checkbox.

You can also compact projects to make sharing easier.
Compacting a project reduces the file size by compressing audio in the project.
Compacting can result in some loss of audio quality.

To compact a project:

1. Choose File > Save as.
2. In the Save As dialog, select the Compact Project checkbox.
3. Choose the compression settings you want to use from the pop-up menu next to the Compact Project checkbox.

Sending a Project to iTunes:

You can send a project to an iTunes playlist, then play your exported projects in iTunes, download them to an iPod, or burn the playlist to a CD.
Files are exported to iTunes in AIFF format. You can convert the exported file to another format, such as AAC or MP3, from within iTunes.

To send a project to an iTunes playlist:

  • Choose Share > Send to iTunes.

The entire project, from the beginning (measure 1) to the end of the last region, is exported.

You can set the name of the iTunes playlist to which files will be exported, and also set
the name of the album and composer, in the Export pane of GarageBand Preferences.

You can also export a single track, or a group of tracks, to an iTunes playlist.
To export a single track, solo the track (or mute all other tracks) before exporting.
To export a group of tracks, solo the tracks (or mute all other tracks) before exporting.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Use these keyboard shortcuts to play, navigate, and edit in GarageBand:

Playback and Navigation:

Start or stop playback > Space bar
Go to beginning > Return or Z or Home
Go to end > Option-Z or End
Move back one measure > Left arrow
Move forward one measure > Right arrow
Move back the visible width of the timeline > Page up
Move forward the visible width of the timeline > Page down
Zoom out > Control-Left arrow
Zoom in > Control-Right arrow

Tracks:

Create a new track > Command-Option-N
Create a new Basic track > Command-Shift-N
Duplicate the selected track > Command-D
Delete the selected track > Command-Delete
Select the next higher track > Up arrow
Select the next lower track > Down arrow
Mute/Unmute the selected track > M
Solo/Unsolo the selected track > S
Show/Hide the track’s volume and pan curves > A
Show/Hide the master track > Command-B
Show/Hide the podcast track > Command-Shift-B
Show/Hide the video track > Command-Option-B

Track Info pane:

Show/Hide the Track Info pane > Command-I
Select the next higher category or instrument > Up arrow (when the Track Info pane is open and a category or instrument is selected)
Select the next lower category or instrument > Down arrow (when the Track Info pane is open and a category or instrument is selected)
Move from instrument list to category list > Left arrow (when the Track Info pane is open and an instrument is selected)
Move from category list to instrument list > Right arrow (when the Track Info pane is open and a category is selected)

Editing and Arranging:

Undo > Command-Z
Redo > Command-Shift-Z
Cut > Command-X
Copy > Command-C
Paste > Command-V
Delete > Delete
Select all > Command-A
Split selected region > Command-T
Join selected regions > Command-J
Snap to grid > Command-G
Enable/Disable ducking > Command-Shift-F

Recording:

Start or stop recording > R
Turn the cycle region on/off > C
Turn the metronome on/off > Command-U
Turn count in on/off > Command-Shift-U
Show/Hide instrument tuner > Command-F

Notation View:

Move selected notes to previous grid position > Left arrow
Move selected notes to next grid position > Right arrow
Move selected notes back one measure > Shift-Left arrow
Move selected notes forward one measure > Shift-Right arrow
Transpose selected notes up one semitone > Up arrow
Transpose selected notes down one semitone > Down arrow
Transpose selected notes up one octave > Shift-Up arrow
Transpose selected notes down one octave > Shift-Down arrow

Adjusting Master Volume:

Raise master volume > Command-Up arrow
Lower master volume > Command-Down arrow

Showing Windows and Editors:

Show track mixer > Command-Y
Show Track Info pane > Command-I
Show editor > Command-E
Show loop browser > Command-L
Show/Hide Media Browser > Command-R
Show onscreen keyboard > Command-K
Show Musical Typing window > Command-Shift-K

File menu commands:

Create new project > Command-N
Open an existing project > Command-O
Close the current project > Command-W
Save the current project > Command-S
Save As > Command-Shift-S

Application menu commands:

Show/Hide GarageBand Preferences > Command-comma (,)
Hide GarageBand > Command-H
Hide other applications > Command-Option-H
Quit GarageBand > Command-Q

Help menu commands:

Open GarageBand Help > Command-question mark (?)

GarageBand Top Tips

GarageBand_Logo

Set up Your Info

By default, GarageBand uses your account information on your Mac as your artist name. Before you start working on your tunes, it’s probably a good idea to change this information.

GarageBand>Preferences under the My Info tab. Change it or you’ll end up like us with a lame Artist name.

Turn off your Screensaver

It seems like a no brainer, but when you have your guitar all hooked up and ready to rock, the last thing you need is your Hello Kitty screen saver popping up right before you strum that first note.

Head to System Preferences > Desktop & Screen Saver and turn it off.

Record with Multiple Devices

Apple tells you that you can now record multiple tracks at once. You plug your guitars in and nothing happens. Here’s what you need to do to get the band back together.

You’re going to create an Aggregate Device. This will alow you to have multiple devices plugged in to your Mac and have GarageBand recognize them individually instead of just one input.

Head on over to Utilities/Audio MIDI Setup. Navigate to the Menu Bar Window>Audio Devices.

Plug in all your fancy musical instruments.

Click on the + symbol in the Audio Devices window. Clcik on Aggregate Devices on your new item and give a name. We chose Geetars for our bass and electric guitars.

Your instruments and how they are connected to your Mac should show up on the right hand side of the Audio Devices window. Check the Use box next to the connections of your instruments. We utilized the Built-in Input for the guitar and an XLR to USB converter called the CEntrance MicPort Pro for our bass.

Launch GarageBand and head on over to GarageBand>Preferences. Click on the Audio/MIDI tab and select your new Audio Input device.

Head up to the Menu Bar and select Track > Enable Multitrack Recording.

In your project, create Real Instrument tracks for your instruments. Don’t bother with Electric Guitar track, it won’t work.

Select each track and click on the i in the lower right hand corner. From there you can select the Input Source for each track.

You can connect up to eight instruments like this. That’s half of the Arcade Fire connected to one Mac.

Write Your Lyrics in GarageBand with Notes

While you’re recording your awesome new single, you can finally have your lyrics right in front of you on the screen instead of scribbled on that Taco Bell napkin or in another application that stops you from interfacing with GarageBand. Just head on over to the Menu Bar and select Window>Notepad.

Smaller GarageBand Project Files

If you’re sharing your project files with band mates over the Internet, sending the larger files can be a huge pain. Thankfully Apple has used some magical Pixies’ dust and made those files smaller.

New artist lessons include Tom Sawyer by Rush and Soul Meets Body by Death Cab for Cutie

Whether you’re into Prog rock or Indie, you should be happy with the new lessons available in GarageBand. Apple says we can expect more.

Magic GarageBand Got Easier

Magic GarageBand was a pain to use before. You’d click on an instrument and maybe a few minutes later, it would switch over. Now the instruments switch over at the beginning of the next measure. It just seems more

iPad and iPhone as MIDI Controllers

Using Wi-Fi you can setup your iPad, iPod touch, or iPhone as a MIDI device if you have an app installed that utilizes OSC.

This is especially helpful if you want to play the piano but hate the keyboard version in GarageBand and you don’t have the money to go out and buy a MIDI keyboard for a few projects.

The apps will need an OSC server on your Mac. Some apps work with Pure Data, while others work best with OSCulator. Either way, you’ll be controlling GarageBand with your iPad or iPhone from across the room.

Awesome!

If you’re feeling like Wi-Fi just won’t cut it, Line 6 has the MIDI Mobilizer dock accessory.

Scoring

Feeling a little Mozart?

Add a Software Instrument. Play your song then click on the Scissors/edit button in the lower left hand corner. Then click on the score button. Now you can adjust the score of your masterpiece.

Select and drag your notes or Command+click to add new notes.

Adjust Audio in your Videos

Flex Time isn’t just for music.

In the Menu Bar go to Track > Show Movie Track

Open the Media Browser and click on the Movies tab. Grab one of your videos and drop it into the movie track.

Click on the edit Scissors at the bottom left of the GarageBand window and now you can stretch out the audio of your movie with Flex Time.

Just like your music, you can extend the length of your movie’s audio, including your dialogue. Yeah, it’s fun to make your words last 20 seconds. Especially if it’s a voice over. Besides the fun factor, this can be helpful for ADR that’s already tied to a video you have.

Oh, and you can score your video here too.










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